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Stephen Hawking, modern cosmology's brightest star, dies aged 76

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"Stephen Hawking, the brightest star in the firmament of science, whose insights shaped modern cosmology and inspired global audiences in the millions, has died aged 76.

His family released a statement in the early hours of Wednesday morning confirming his death at his home in Cambridge."

 

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2018/mar/14/stephen-hawking-professor-dies-aged-76

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The man was brilliant and had a fantastic sense of humor.. I just re-watched this TED appearance and man, the genius ability to make complex and mind-boggling science simple and funny to listen to as well as understandable to us 'simple folk' was a gift to all of us;

 

https://www.ted.com/speakers/stephen_hawking

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It's kind of interesting, isn't it? Often I feel (and heard, years ago) that geniuses or big contributors usually only get real (global or wide) recognition after they perish. Maybe it's that effect of realizing you lose something when it's gone?

 

Of course, surely, he was already valued alive and had contributions. Not like he wasn't known before death. But was he on people's minds before the news? Not as often on a global scale I like to think.

 

And as people die, sadly, it is now upon others to fill the gap, to be great minds, explorers, achievers - to bring us forward collectively. Death can't be avoided or notably delayed so far, so it is upon others to pick up the torch and carry it into the uncertain future.

 

It might not be any of us (on that level). But someone ideally will. I tip my hat though. Not everyone will leave such a mark or legacy. Especially under such physical conditions.

 

And I suppose now he will truly know or have seen, experienced, etc. what comes after death - if anything, at all.

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16 minutes ago, Warden said:

It's kind of interesting, isn't it? Often I feel (and heard, years ago) that geniuses or big contributors usually only get real (global or wide) recognition after they perish. Maybe it's that effect of realizing you lose something when it's gone?

 

Of course, surely, he was already valued alive and had contributions. Not like he wasn't known before death. But was he on people's minds before the news? Not as often on a global scale I like to think.

 

And as people die, sadly, it is now upon others to fill the gap, to be great minds, explorers, achievers - to bring us forward collectively. Death can't be avoided or notably delayed so far, so it is upon others to pick up the torch and carry it into the uncertain future.

 

It might not be any of us (on that level). But someone ideally will. I tip my hat though. Not everyone will leave such a mark or legacy. Especially under such physical conditions.

 

And I suppose now he will truly know or have seen, experienced, etc. what comes after death - if anything, at all.

I'm more impressed by Hawkins' will to live and do, while suffering a severe condition, than all his work. I don't have that type of strength, but it's a universal kind of battle for everyone in a way. But to keep battling and want to be a productive member of society, this is a really good thing I think people see in Hawkins' life. He just happened to have a cool hobby too...

 

 

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