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So after 4 months...the game got really boring!


DrFrigoPorco
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3 hours ago, rothbardian said:

The Metaverse is not a virtual space. Digital content experiences like Second Life are often seen as “proto-Metaverses” because they (A) lack game-like goals or skill systems; (B) are virtual hangouts that persist; (C) offer nearly synchronous content updates; and (D) have real humans represented by digital avatars. However, these are not sufficient attributes for the Metaverse.

 

The Metaverse, will...


The issue I have with the concept of the metaverse is that is is a grand convergence of technology.

 

Unfortunately, technology is often more divergent than convergent. Radio is still a multi-billion dollar industry. People still need to make phone calls even if texting is more popular. People still watch network T.V. People still use dial up

 

Beyond that....which part of your description doesn't already exist in the Internet?

 

It's live and persistent.

It has a full economy.

It has no hard cap beyond the physical limits of server infrastructure and cost...which short of some incredible quantum computer breakthroughs, there will always be a limit here. 

It straddles the physical world thanks to Amazon et. al.

It has extreme interoperability of data and networks thanks to APIs and common protocols like JSON, oAuth, GraphQL - that doesn't mean private companies are keen on sharing with competitors or 3rd parties unless there's mutual benefit, but this tech is not new. Private entities have to be willing to embrace interoperability, but this isn't a technical barrier. 

It is already populated by content created by a huge range of people -- mostly individuals. 

 

The metaverse, to me, has exactly the same capabilities of the Internet...but with some vague additional layer of cohesive "newness". Otherwise it sounds like the only difference between the metaverse and the Internet is that the metaverse mandates a sense of "presence" -- some avatar to "explore" this novel new realm.

 

So basically the Internet with WASD keys? I'm only trying to be a little be snarky, I'm also trying to genuinely understand what people mean by the metaverse and how exactly it differs from today's Internet technically and commercially. 

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4 minutes ago, ShippyLongstalking said:

So basically the Internet with WASD keys? I'm only trying to be a little be snarky, I'm also trying to genuinely understand what people mean by the metaverse and how exactly it differs from today's Internet technically and commercially. 

Very likely. If you want a simpler way to think about the Metaverse, you can imagine it as the Nightmare Before Christmas – you can walk into any experience or activity, and potentially address almost any of your needs, from a single starting point or world that’s also populated by everyone else you know. This is why hypertext is such a key example. But what’s important is to recognize the Metaverse isn’t a game, a piece of hardware, or an online experience. This is like saying is ‘World of Warcraft’, the iPhone, or Google is the Internet. They are digital worlds, devices, services, websites, etc. The Internet is a wide set of protocols, technology, tubes and languages, plus access devices and content and communication experiences atop them. Metaverse will be too.

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1 hour ago, Lethys said:

And lets see if 10 million players join du and how it handles those for 3. 

You're totally correct on this. Eve Online, for example, can technically have more than 100,000 players “in the same game”, but they are split across different galaxies (i.e. server nodes). As a result, a player only really sees or interacts with a small handful of other players at any one time. In addition, traveling to another galaxy means disconnecting from one server and loading another (which the game is able to narratively “hide” by forcing players to jump to light speed in order to cross the vastness of space). And if/when Eve Online did get to battles involving hundreds of users, the system slowed to a crawl. And this still worked because the gameplay dynamic was based on predominantly large-scale, pre-planned ship-based combat. If it was a “fast-twitch” game such as Rocket League or Call of Duty, these slowdowns would have been unplayable.

 

A number of companies are working hard to solve this problem, such as the aptly named Improbable. But this is an enormous computational challenge and one that fights against the underlying design/intent of the Internet.

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