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Rhovan Haerel

Alpha Tester
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About Rhovan Haerel

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    Member

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location:
    Approaching Alioth
  • backer_title
    Ruby Founder
  • Alpha
    Yes

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  1. discordauth:KoK9Xwkp6UfiGZcTi6KqisnfJIgDYN6ggrsZm2hUIqc=

  2. Getting back to the original question: I am also a Linux user. Ultimately it is too early to be able to say if it will work. Much has yet to be revealed about the client, and the many changes yet to be made can all affect the ability to run under WINE. Meanwhile, over the course of DU's development, many additions will be made to WINE to fix the gaps that potentially prevent using it under WINE today. It will come down to what the system requirements are for the Windows client: 32bit vs 64bit, Windows 7 supported or only Windows 10, etc. Those system requirements have not yet been defined, and the current client requirements for the pre-alpha are under NDA. For those saying that WINE will make the game too slow, not inherently. Running something like teamspeak will probably cause more load/latency than WINE would for most applications. Some portions of the WINE implementation can run better than native Windows because native single-threaded routines are implemented in a multi-threaded fashion in WINE. WINE is really a remarkable piece of software. I would also hold out some hope for a native Linux client, even if unsupported by NQ. NQ has acknowledged Linux in the past such as this from during the Kickstarter: I have not seen anything where NQ has yet tried to gauge the size of Linux interest. In reality, I expect it will only be a small portion of its user base. But, perhaps NQ will allow us to use the client they are already building for their own developers on an as-is basis - no installer, no fancy updater, just a tarball we need to resolve dependencies on ourselves. Meanwhile, the client technologies public listed (Unigine and Coherent GT), combined with the publicly-disclosed Linux use by developers, encourages me that the client is less-likely to have technologies or libraries which cannot be handled by WINE. I have been quietly following development, hoping that I will be able to play on Linux. I also admit that for a game that will have an on-going playing cost, $100 for a Windows license is not that excessive, regardless of my personal dislike for Microsoft or the Windows desktop design.
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