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Alpha 1

Found 4 results

  1. The devs have said that automated mining will probably not be an option. As a student of business and economics, here's what I think: ABSTRACT: Limiting script automation for both mining and weapons fire will greatly limit the capacity for economic growth and in-game innovation. The mining industry, for example, will start out with individuals mining for minerals and directly selling them to other players or on an open market. It will eventually evolve into a number of mining corporations that will be able to provide minerals more cheaply through an organized workforce and semi-automated processes. This is inevitable, as it should be. But why limit the mining industry to this level of business innovation? By disallowing further automation, yes, the market for mundane repetitive tasks like mining by hand will be preserved. But what would happen to the broader job market in a simulated economy where automation is unregulated? It would expand exponentially. How would automated mining exponentially expand economic growth and job availability? Well, the whole purpose of automation is to reduce labor costs, to reduce the price of goods (raw minerals, in this case), so that, in a competitive free market economy, businesses can stay... competitive. Inevitably, reducing the price of raw minerals allows other businesses, further up the chain of production, to increase production and lower their prices (competitive market, remember). These reduced prices further up the chain of production lead to increased demand and, therefore, new market opportunities. STORY TIME: John Smith is a miner. He mines steel all day for Mineral Corp, gets a commission based on how much steel he mines, and Mineral Corp sells the steel to spaceship manufacturing facilities. One day Mineral Corp decides to cut costs by using automated mining drones. Nooooo!!!! Curse you Human Ingenuity!! Let's look at what just happened: In order to cut costs, mining corporations are now buying automated mining drones. This new demand for drones is providing jobs for programmers, industrial designers, manufacturers, and even truckers (to transport all the extra minerals that are being more cheaply produced and are increasingly in demand by all these industries)! Back to John Smith: John lost his job to robots. The Luddite fear that soulless computers will replace all the honest employees has come true! *cough cough* But when John's at home, drinking away his sorrows with some Pan Galactic Gargle Blaster, he opens up the classifieds and is shocked to see hundreds of jobs available that weren't there yesterday! Not only jobs related to the production of mining drones, but many seemingly unrelated jobs! Where did these other jobs come from? They came from the steel being cheaper. Businesses that use that steel for product production, like spaceships and buildings, can now sell their products more cheaply. Having cheaper spaceships increases the demand for spaceships because more people can afford them. In order to meet that increased demand, spaceship manufacturers must increase their production by hiring more employees (new jobs! Yay!). So now, even though less people are mining by hand, more people are building spaceships (as well as countless other things)! John Smith may not be mining anymore, but he has a new job now, that pays more, and he can enjoy a cheaper cost of living thanks to those beautiful automated mining drones. BASIC FORMULA: Automation = reduced cost. Reduced cost + competition = reduced price. Reduced price = increased demand. Increased demand = increased production. Increased production = increased job availability. Automation + competition = increased job availability. Can we please have free automation scripting? (I may touch on automated weapons-fire later)
  2. Orius

    Stock Exchange

    When the economy swells in the game, will there be a stock exchange market, similar to Wall Street or something else?
  3. MasteredRed

    Political/Economical Management

    Hello whoever may be reading this!(Hopefully developers) I'll get to the point I suppose. When looking at some of the promises that were given, you mentioned that players would be the political and economical structures. Now, if you don't have any plans or would like to take some ideas, I've got some right here. * First off, if we are to reflect off of the real world, political and economical structures have stability depending on the actions, resources or whatever is put into them. Therefor, if for instance you have a bad setup for a government, it might be able to fall. I know it sounds difficult to imagine, but if you were to put that risk of your government falling if you didn't manage it enough, it could add an exciting or dangerous element to the game. Another way to put it is guilds or as such. They are simply groups of people, not bound by a faction or otherwise higher overarching theme. This is an uninteresting way to manage civilizations, where the risks are much smaller. However, in a political environment, if things weren't managed correctly, things might begin to fail. I don't have any idea's behind what would cause the system or trigger it to fail, but it might be something to consider. * Secondly, let's think about political and economics as being tied. If you have a government, you need a stable economy. I'm simply pointing out a co-entanglement of these two very important systems. As well, if you have a stable and prosperous economy, it might be possible to improve your political reign, expand your civilization or as such because of it. *Third off, is the system of banks. Now, I'm pretty sure that banks are going to be needed if you are to expand your government. Now, a large discussion should be how they are used. If banks are used improperly or are not set up well, it may be impossible for a government to survive and a player to prosper, so this should be taken into account or have a default system for banking. If not, there are plenty of other creative options as well. *Finally, there is the discussion of currency. Now, I'm sure you've thought of this well and true but I'd just like to point out some thoughts. A global currency is probably one of the easiest options to make, but if you are to have an economics system, then it might be a good idea to think about this. If each government has it's own economic system, then the global currency is really easy to use and not at all interesting in my opinion. So, I have constructed this idea. If it were possible to create a number of base currencies, and allow governments to "lend" or "barrow" off them. Then, if it becomes possible, allow them to create their own in the future, with a possible way to convert currencies. That's just some idea's I've come up with. Again, I can't say what you are going to do but there are some really good ideas. Maybe I helped you out, maybe I created a new game mechanic. I can't really say but I can't wait to see the final product! For the players who also take a look at this because I know you will, please think about these aspects of the game so that it might have more to it than build, explore and stuff.
  4. Hello, I have a idea proposal for some economic interaction. I suggest a semi automated method for farming and or resource extraction. The method in mind would tie into other commodities increasing player to player economics. The nature of mining ore gathering, or mass producing items is usually fairly tedious and not much fun after you've harvested your 10,000th row of corn or zapped your 1,000,000th chunk of iron. So as a side career path to you being the biggest baddest space pirate you also want to grow asparagus, but you dont actually want to get dirt on your hands what you actually want is to market asparagus. What if you could hire workers controlled by a basic artificial intelligence to do menial labor such as this. If the resources couldnt be spared for processing hordes of 3d models then perhaps the calculations for growing and harvesting ect. could just be crunched at specific tics - with just a handful of models for representation I was thinking of a tiered system each with its own advantages to suit player's tastes, interest's, roleplay factors, maybe even correlate to missions. Thus you will acquire some types of labor below, give an interface a command and some resources and allow it to start doing its thing. Maybe you tell it to automatically pull a certain resource from a specified container or your pack - or not. The most basic of the base to the most advanced. Lowest Slave Economy - Cheap cost-effective results Forced Labor - These guys dont work too hard, but you also dont pay them. Upkeep Costs Basic Foodstuff; Output Yields 75% Slaves - People that have no chance of escaping their bonds, they work hard because the alternatives are unpleasant.Upkeep Costs Basic Foodstuff, Wooden Housing 100% Indentured Slaves - They may not like it, however, for one reason or another they have signed or waived their rights to you and therefor they WILL like it . Upkeep Basic Foodstuff, Basic Housing 125% - 50% Chance 25%Boost Labor economy - Workers of the world, a chance for something better Entry Worker - Poor and unhappy these guys have little chance of advancing in society. Upkeep Low Wages, Basic Housing 100% Educated Worker - Unions and Educated workers, these guys have earned their due. Upkeep Medium Wage Apartment/Medium Housing 150% - 50% chance to produce and additional 25% yield. Superior Worker - Any number of men and women could apply to this field be they Genetically modified, Cybernetically Enhanced, or just a plain Genius. High Pay, Deluxe Housing 200% Yield 50% Chance of 50% bonus Digital Econ - Producing according the the \program\ Robotics - Programmed Machinery to perform labor. Energy, Machine Parts, 125% Autonomous Robotics- Machinery capable of re-configuring itself for greater task efficiency. Energy, Machine Parts, Computer Components 175% Sentient Nano-robotics - Machines networked and calculating, they live to work, just a grade below artificial intelligence they are aware of their own existence though they cannot fathom independent thinking rendering them unable to revolt against society. Energy, Machine Parts, Computer Components, Bio-Processors 225% Efficiency Slaves and robotics could be items placeable on the open market. whereas Workers from the labor type economy could possibly be hired from staff agencies / receptacles / or an Employment Agent NPC. To reiterate the effectiveness of the tiers if it is confusing posted the other way. Inputs/Needs Outputs/Efficiency 1 Food 75% 2 Food, Primitive Housing 100% 3 Food, Basic Housing, Clothing 125% 50% Chance of 25% increase 1 Low Wage, Basic Housing 100% 2 Medium Wage, Medium Housing 150% 50% chance of 25% increase 3 High Pay, Expensive housing 200% 50% chance of 50% increase 1 Energy, Machine Parts 125% 2 Energy, Machine Parts, Computer Components 175% 3 Energy, Machine Parts, Computer Components, Bio-Processors 225% The point to the Economy types, is that certain player or computer organisations might impose rules or regulations over an entire group. Thanks for reading, this idea is a bit rough, I hope you can see potential of it though; please feel free to expose any flaws you see in this concept.
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