Suddenly the internet does what it does best and spewed forth another theoretical means of space travel: Not only does it solve the gravity issue during space travel but also can reach anywhere in the known universe within a human lifetime. (The only slight niggle, a tiny flaw, is that you need vast quantities of fuel to do so. But let's ignore that for now.)   So let's look at the Novarks journey: It took the Novark near on 10000 earth years to reach its destination (let's say 9967ish) So we take the space travel calculator outlined in the above video and plug in (9967 / 2) 4983.5 years in the place that used to be earth.   http://nathangeffen.webfactional.com/spacetravel/spacetravel.php   Why half you ask? Because this is half the equation: accelerate to near light speed and at halfway point start decelerating. Take any answers and multiply by 2 and we have the full trip.   From this a few interesting things crop up:  It takes around 33 years to travel to Alioth. At least it seems that way for those onboard the Novark if they were awake. Cryopods would be useful for saving food, but a human (provided they had enough sustenance) would easy live long enough to see the end of this journey in a comfortable 1G. The distance traveled is around 3 kpc (kilo-parsecs). Around 9963 light years.   Why is the second point interesting? We know the Novark headed off vaguely towards the Scutum-Centaurus arm of the Milky Way Galaxy.     The closest point of the arm is towards the center of the galaxy. So like no man before us we head in that direction. And if we look for a point of interest in that direction at around 3 kpc we find a globular cluster of stars known as Messier 22 (M22)     Alioth could be somewhere in there... Or not. Space is very big after all.   At least now we know that the trick to near light speed travel is a very efficient fuel source.   P.S. A similar observation as far as distance goes was observed here:   Though my solution was by far the messier.